wife-slices-off her cheating husbands penis

Scorned wife slices off her cheating husband’s penis with a box cutter

Scorned wife slices off her cheating husband's penis with a boxcutter

A wife sliced her husband’s penis almost clean off with a box cutter after she found out he was cheating on her with her best friend.

In happier times both she and her husband sold fried chicken in the Thai tourist town of Pattaya, known for its nightlife and popular with Brits.

But rumours began to circle that her husband, identified only as Somchai, was being unfaithful. When she realised he had allegedly cheated with her best friend it became too much.

She pretended to forgive him and lured him to take off his trousers by saying she would give him oral sex

Jilted wife lures cheating husband into sex trap before almost severing his penis with box cutter

But when he began to relax , she pulled out the box cutter knife and slashed at his genitals, almost severing his penis from his body completely.

When the extent of his injuries became clear, his wife called an ambulance for him.

UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 05:  Police officers on guard outside the Israeli embassy in Kensington, London, U.K., Thursday, October 5 2006. The head of London's Metropolitan Police ordered an investigation after one of his Muslim officers was excused from guarding the Israeli Embassy in the city.  (Photo by Michael Crabtree/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Controlled explosion after terror alert outside Israeli embassy in London

Paramedics found Somchai in the middle of the street with blood pouring down his legs, clutching an ice pack to his groin and in severe distress.He was rushed for surgery at the Bang Lamung Hospital with his wife in the ambulance too, but it’s too early to say if he will make a full recovery.

Police said they would wait for him to recover before asking questions about the attack.

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decide on charges in Cincinnati Zoo case

Ohio prosecutor to decide on charges in Cincinnati Zoo case

In some parts of Africa, tourists and researchers routinely trek into the undergrowth to see gorillas in their natural habitat where there are no barriers or enclosures. (Jeff McCurry/Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden via The Cincinatti Enquirer via AP, File)© Provided parts of Africa, tourists and researchers routinely trek into the undergrowth to see gorillas in their natural habitat where there are no barriers or enclosures. (Jeff McCurry/Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical…CINCINNATI — An Ohio prosecutor plans to release his decision Monday on whether he will pursue charges against the family of a 3-year-old boy who got into the Cincinnati Zoo’s gorilla exhibit, leading to the fatal shooting of an endangered gorilla to protect the child.

gorilla : Police to investigate parents

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters has scheduled an afternoon news conference, in which he’s expected to discuss his conclusions after a review into the family’s actions.

Legal experts have said that prosecution on child endangerment or similar charges seems unlikely. The family has declined to comment.

The zoo says it was the first such breach in Gorilla World’s 38 years of existence, but the exhibit will reopen Tuesday with a higher, reinforced barrier. The boy apparently climbed over the barrier May 28 before falling about 15 feet into a shallow moat.

FILE - In this Sunday, May 29, 2016 file photo, a child touches the head of a gorilla statue where flowers have been placed outside the Gorilla World exhibit at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, in Cincinnati, where a western lowland gorilla was fatally shot Saturday, May 28, 2016, to protect a 3-year-old boy who had entered its exhibit. In some parts of Africa, tourists and researchers routinely trek into the undergrowth to see gorillas in their natural habitat where there are no barriers or enclosures.©  a child touches the head of a gorilla statue where flowers have been placed outside the Gorilla World exhibit at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, in Cinci…A special response team shot and killed the gorilla, 17-year-old Harambe, after concluding the boy’s life was at stake.

A Cincinnati police report identifies the boy’s mother as Michelle Gregg, 32, who works at a preschool near Cincinnati. The child’s father isn’t named in the report, and it’s unclear whether he was at the zoo at the time of the incident.

The boy’s family has said he is doing well at home after being treated at a hospital. Police said he had scrapes on his head and knee.

Police released 911 tapes last week that highlighted the confusion and panic in the moments when the boy plunged into the gorilla exhibit.

“He’s dragging my son! I can’t watch this!” a woman says in the 911 call. As she pleads for help, she shouts at her son repeatedly: “Be calm!”

The police report states that witnesses said the gorilla initially appeared to be protecting the child, but after onlookers began screaming, he became “agitated and scared” and began dragging the child.

The boy’s family has expressed gratitude to the zoo for protecting his life.

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baby swap family return home

El Salvador baby swap family return home after nine-month wait

The Cushworths at the airport in Dallas, Texas

 

Mrs Cushworth said she had become suspicious when she noticed that the features of the newborn differed from those of the baby doctors had handed to her when she gave birth by emergency Caesarean.

“He was just passed by me and I gave him a kiss and then he was taken to the nursery and that was the last time I saw him,” she said.

The next day nurses brought her a baby and insisted it was hers, despite her immediate doubts.

She said she had thought the second baby’s skin was darker.

After returning to their home in Dallas, Texas, Mrs Cushworth took a DNA test four months later which said there was a 0% chance she could be the mother of the baby she had been given.

‘Not my child’

Mr Cushworth said: “I just accepted it as my child. Now I look back at the pictures around the time we came to Dallas when he was three months old and I’m shocked that I never suspected, because you can see that it’s just obviously not my child if you look at some of the pictures.

“I don’t know how I didn’t ask myself. You just don’t think about these things. Who thinks about these things?”

His wife added: “I think we were in love with the baby. Even when I did the DNA tests, I thought I was betraying him. That was the feeling I had – I’m betraying my son but I cannot live with this.”

Both babies were quickly returned to their biological parents but the Cushworths have since been trying to get a birth certificate, so they could return home to the US.

They were helped by the British Ambassador to El Salvador, Bernhard Garside.

“When we first got involved it looked very much like an uphill struggle,” he said. “My fear was we weren’t really going to see a happy conclusion to this.”

He said swapping the babies back was “the easy bit”, but unravelling the paperwork took a long time through the Salvadoran court system and was only completed thanks to “good old fashioned diplomacy”.

“If we have been able to play a part in it somewhere then it makes my job worthwhile,” he said.

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Zoo fall boy ‘doing well’

Cincinnati gorilla shooting: Zoo fall boy ‘doing well’

 Harambe, a 17-year-old gorilla at the Cincinnati Zoo is pictured in this undated handout photo provided by Cincinnati Zoo.

A three-year-old boy who fell into a gorilla enclosure at Cincinnati Zoo, leading to the animal being shot, is said to be “doing well”.

Harambe, a 17-year-old endangered western lowland gorilla, was shot dead after he started dragging the boy.

Police said they were investigating the actions of the boy’s parents leading up to his fall.

On Wednesday, they also released a recording of the call the boy’s mother made to police.

In it, she is heard crying: “He’s dragging my son…I can’t watch this.” She repeatedly shouts “be calm” at the boy.

In a statement on Wednesday, the boy’s family thanked zoo staff “for their actions taken to protect our child”.

They also asked that any donations be made to the zoo in Harambe’s name. The zoo has suggested donations would go towards a gorilla conservation project in the Congo.

The online reaction to Harambe’s death

The zoo says it had no choice but to kill the gorilla, and has defended its safety measures around the enclosure.

But animal activists have accused the zoo of negligence.

Stop Animal Exploitation Now, a Cincinnati-based animal rights group, said it had filed a federal complaint against the zoo with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

The parents of the boy, who suffered minor injuries in the incident, have also faced heavy criticism on social media.

Video footage showed the boy being dragged through shallow water by the animal in Saturday’s incident. Zookeepers shot Harambe soon afterwards.

The zoo maintains it had no choice but to shoot the gorilla as tranquilisers would not have worked in time to save the boy.

It also said its Gorilla World exhibit was safe and exceeded required protocols.

But Michael Budkie, of Stop Animal Exploitation Now, said the USDA should fine the zoo for having an exhibit that the public could access.

“What happened this weekend made it very clear that the physical barriers at the Cincinnati Zoo are not adequate to keep people out of the enclosures, obviously,” he said, adding that the enclosure was reported to be over 30 years old.

He also said the zoo had been criticised back in March after two polar bears were able to wander out of their pen into a service hallway.

Flowers lay around a bronze statue of a gorilla and her baby outside the Cincinnati Zoo
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gorilla : Police to investigate parents

Cincinnati gorilla shooting: Police to investigate parents

Protesters mourn Harambe
Image captionMany are criticising the zoo and the boy’s parents for the gorilla’s death

A police investigation into the killing of a gorilla at Cincinnati Zoo after a three-year-old fell into an enclosure will focus on the boy’s parents.

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joseph Deters said the police would later “confer with our office on possible criminal charges”.

The zoo says it had no choice but to kill the gorilla, and has defended its safety measures around the enclosure.

Animal activists have accused the zoo of negligence.

Stop Animal Exploitation Now, a Cincinnati-based animal rights group, said it had filed a federal complaint against the zoo with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

The police said that their review of the incident “is only regarding the actions of the parents/family that led up to the incident and not related to the operation or safety of the Cincinnati Zoo.”

The parents of the boy, who suffered minor injuries in the incident, have also faced heavy criticism on social media.

Cincinnati Police on Tuesday corrected earlier statements which had given the boy’s age as four.

The case report provided by police states that witnesses said the gorilla at first appeared to be protecting the boy, but then grew agitated due to screaming onlookers. It then began to drag him.

Harambe, a 17-year-old gorilla at the Cincinnati Zoo is pictured in this undated handout photo provided by Cincinnati Zoo.
Image captionHarambe was an endangered western lowland gorilla

The child fell into the enclosure of 17-year-old Harambe, an endangered western lowland gorilla, on Saturday.

Video footage showed the boy being dragged through shallow water by the animal. Zookeepers shot Harambe soon afterwards.

The zoo on Monday defended its actions, saying it had no choice but to shoot the gorilla as tranquilisers would not have worked in time to save the boy.

It also said its Gorilla World exhibit was safe and exceeded required protocols.

But Michael Budkie, of Stop Animal Exploitation Now, said the USDA should fine the zoo for having an exhibit that the public could access.

“What happened this weekend made it very clear that the physical barriers at the Cincinnati Zoo are not adequate to keep people out of the enclosures, obviously,” he said, adding that the enclosure was reported to be over 30 years old.

He also said the zoo had been criticised back in March after two polar bears were able to wander out of their pen into a service hallway.


#JusticeForHarambe – How it’s playing on social media

Painting of gorilla. Picture reads 'Justice for Harambe'Image JUSTICE FOR HARAMBE

Michelle Gregg, the mother of the boy who fell into a gorilla enclosure, has become the victim of online abuse.

People were quick to take to social media after zoo officials defended the decision to shoot the animal.

Eddie Whrnbrg wrote on Facebook: “…the zoos aren’t the problem. It’s the idiotic parents.”

On Twitter @blxxm83 wrote: “So lazy parents can’t control their wild kids and a beautiful endangered animal gets shot and killed because of it? #Harambe #RIPHarambe”

In another tweet @brittrosenthal wrote “Sad thing is it looked like #Harambe was protecting the kid more than the parent was. #CincinnatiZoo”

Some even called for Ms Gregg to be dismissed from her job.

Ms Gregg, posting on Facebook after the incident, said her son was “able to walk away with a concussion and a few scrapes… no broken bones or internal injuries”.

She also had this to say to her critics: As a society we are quick to judge how a parent could take their eyes of of their child and if anyone knows me I keep a tight watch on my kids. Accidents happen but I am thankful people were in the right place today.”

Her Facebook page has since been deleted.

About the same time as she made her comments, a Facebook group calledJustice for Harambe was set up.

An online petition signed by more than 300,000 people was also created, calling for her to be held accountable for Harambe’s death.

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